How to Swingweight a Set

March 23, 2011

This particular article will be helpful for LG, so I decided to go ahead and build up a post about this.

I recently swingweighted my iron set–KZG ZO blades. The shafts were shorter than I was used to, so I decided I wanted them to play at a higher swingweight in order to make up the lost leverage.

First things first, get your supplies in order:

1. Two-part epoxy – depends on size, but enough for this job is $5 or so.
2. ferrules – make sure you get the right size for your irons, which can range from .335 to .370; I bought mine on ebay, and you can really spend any amount of money you want to on them. Approximately $5, we’ll say. Search on ebay for “ferrule .XXX” where .XXX is the tip diameter you need.
3. Swingweights. This part is a little more difficult, and can be expensive. A full set of swingweights isn’t a good idea. I would recommend you figure out what you need first and then go online and buy them. I got brass weights on ebay from a great seller todd1186 (he’ll combine shipping if you just ask, see http://cgi.ebay.com/6-Gram-Brass-Tip-Weights-370-Steel-Iron-1-Dozen-/250722289456?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a60368730).
4. A swingweight scale. These can be anywhere from $20 used up to hundreds. If you’d prefer not to use one, you can always take them to your local golfsmith or edwin watts store and ask them to spec it out for you. If they’re not busy, they might actually do it, especially if you’re telling them you’re considering having them swingweighted.
5. Acetone. $4 at home depot
6. A kitchen/postal scale. $4-$6 on ebay
7. Lead tape (or other weight)

Now, that’s about it for supplies–sans paper towels, newspaper, and other cheap stuff.

Once you know what your current swingweight is, you can decide what you want it to go to. Typically, you will want to increase swingweight because OEM sets are typically a little light on the scale. Typical sets will run D0 or lighter. Most pros like Read the rest of this entry »

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A GolfWRX member sent me a message about pulling shafts after viewing the post on replacing a Sonartec shaft, located at https://thepowerfade.wordpress.com/2010/10/17/how-i-do-club-repair-and-you-can-too/. Check out the interaction below:

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Sent 13 January 2011 – 12:36 PM
Hey man. A few quick questions for ya. I live in Pittsburgh PA and since we have 7 inches of snow, there will be no more golf. Time for some DIY golf.

I have some limited experience with golf DIY. I was able to refinish and regroove 2 wedges a few months ago. I did the paintfill and everything.

I’m looking to refinish a set of 695cbs that I have. My questions come in here. The 2 wedges that I did before, I wasn’t worried about keeping the shafts as they were not wedges I planned on playing. So I just heated the s*** out of the shaft and pulled it out. Since these are a set of irons I plan on playing with, I want to take the heads off as carefully as possible.

What is the best way to pull iron shafts that I plan on playing with? They are steel. I assume that I will need new ferrules as well. Can you tell me that best and cheapest place you know to buy new ferrules? Really appreciate the help and great write up. If you have a writeup to link me to or if you have some step-by-step instructions, I would really appreciate it. Thx.

Sent 13 January 2011 – 01:45 PM
Sounds like a pretty easy job. Graphite is a lot harder to deal with.

Since you “heated the s***” out of the two wedges, I assume you already have a blow torch. I would make sure it’s a propane torch, as other types (acetylene, butane, for example) can get too hot and damage your club. I use a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch (about $20 at Home Depot).

Your ferrules will be irreparably damaged, yes. Before you remove the shaft, hit them with the torch for about 2 seconds so they melt a little bit, then let them cool for about 20 seconds and cut them off with a box cutter.

Once the ferrule is off, you don’t need any special equipment to take off an iron shaft (this is where the difference between graphite and steel is really seen). What I do is (1) put a heat-resistant glove on my left hand (I’m right-handed), (2) start the torch, (3) pick up the club in my left hand (held far enough away from the head that I don’t burn my glove), (4) heat the hosel, (5) put the torch down and turn it off, (6) switch hands so that I now hold the (unheated part of the) shaft in my right hand, (7) grip the head with my gloved left hand, and (8) give the club head a twist to see if the head has come loose. I usually start with about 25 seconds or so of heat, then try to twist, then 10s more of heat, then twist, then 10s, then twist, and so on until the epoxy bond breaks. MAKE SURE that you don’t just heat the hosel in one spot–continually move up and down the hosel and around the hosel (face side, crown side, sole side, etc.) so that you’re not focusing in one spot. This can cause overheating of the one spot, leaving marks and, possibly, damage to your club. Plus, it takes a lot longer. Heat loosens the epoxy bond. If you’re staying in one spot with the heat, it has to travel all the way around the shaft to get to the other side. That means that one side will be hotter than the other side. If you circulate around the hosel with the torch, the heat will be even all the way around, so you won’t have any hot spots, and it’ll go faster. As with all things, if you take your time, you should be OK.

As for ferrules, sorry I can’t help much. There are some threads on GolfWRX.com/forums if you want “custom” ferrules (where you can buy custom colors) and I know there are offerings available online. Otherwise, it’s usually best just to buy a pack at Golfsmith or on golfsmith.com (if you don’t have a golfsmith near you). Always make sure you get the right ones for your shaft diameter.

If you need any more help (how to get the ferrule on the shaft, how to clean out the hosel, etc.) let me know. I’m happy to help.

Sent 13 January 2011 – 02:03 PM
Thx for the reply. I really appreciate it.

I have Sensicore high launch shafts in my irons. Do you know how I would tell what diameter the shaft is and what diameter ferrules I would need?

Sent 13 January 2011 – 02:14 PM

Re the “diameter,” Titleist should have material online somewhere about the hosel bore for 695cbs. If you’d rather not waste your time, you can actually call Golfsmith–they have a book where they can look it up. Usually irons are .355, but you need to confirm before buying. Also, don’t do like my friend did and mix up .355 with .335.

Let me know how it goes or if you have more questions.

Sent 13 January 2011 – 02:43 PM
HAHA. Will do. Thx. I will call Golfsmith and find out. My time frame is really whenever I get home from work. I dont have anything to do now that there’s snow on the ground so I’ll be messing around with it at night. I’ll take some pics and if you want to use them great. I’ll shoot you a message if I have any other questions.

Thx again.